Winona Main Street Becomes Newest Program of Minnesota Main Street

For Immediate Release

 For more information:
Emily Northey
Minnesota Main Street Program Coordinator
Preservation Alliance of Minnesota
(o) 651.293.9047 x4; (c) 651.262.8770
enorthey@mnpreservation.org

 Winona Main Street Becomes Newest Program of Minnesota Main Street

(WINONA, MN – June 17, 2013) — Winona is the newest Designated Main Street community with Minnesota Main Street. The Winona Main Street program, a partnership of the Winona Area Chamber of Commerce and the City of Winona, made an application to become a Designated Main Street Program in Spring 2013.  After Minnesota Main Street carefully reviewed their application and conducted a site visit with interviews, an invitation to join was made.

During the site visit, the state review team praised Winona Main Street and its partners for their collegiality, energy, time, and focused effort that went into developing existing work, the application, and site visit. The application demonstrated the longevity of research and thoughtfulness of persons and organizations who had already started working together in addition to or complementary to what the Main Street Program offers.

Winona’s Main Street District is the historic heart of the community of Winona, population 27,592. Their District includes two National Register Historic Districts, a locally designated historic district, and over 206 businesses.

Main Street Programs in Minnesota, such as Winona Main Street, are local, volunteer-driven downtown revitalization programs coordinated by a local staff person. Each program follows the National Trust’s Main Street Four Point Approach of historic preservation based economic development. To assist local programs with their work, Minnesota Main Street provides them with $6,400 in technical assistance funds annually, complimentary training registrations, networking with other communities, and consultation from state program staff.

Minnesota Main Street is recognized by the National Trust Main Street Center® as the official statewide coordinating program in Minnesota and has been financed in part with funds provided by the State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the Minnesota Historical Society.

For more information about Minnesota Main Street, visit: archive.mnpreservation.org/programs/main-street. For more information about Winona Main Street visit www.winonachamber.com.

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Minnesota Main Street is a program of the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota and is recognized by the National Trust Main Street Center® as the official statewide coordinating program in Minnesota.  As the statewide coordinating program, Minnesota Main Street provides participating local Main Street organizations with the training, tools, information, and networking they need to be successful in their downtown revitalization efforts.  The Minnesota Main Street Program has been financed in part with funds provided by the State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the Minnesota Historical Society.

The Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM) is a statewide, private, nonprofit organization advocating for the preservation of Minnesota’s historic resources. The Alliance was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 1981 by Minnesota citizens concerned about the future of the state’s architectural and cultural landmarks. The Alliance has grown into a network representing thousands of voices across the state. Beyond our membership, we collaborate and partner with other organization and agencies from the national to the local level.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) Main Street Four Point Approach® is a community-driven, comprehensive strategy used to revitalize downtown and neighborhood business districts throughout the United States. It is a common-sense way to address the variety of issues and problems that challenge traditional business districts. Over 1,600 communities have adopted the Main Street approach in the past 25 years to look again at Main Street, their heart of the community, to save its historic buildings, to revive its commercial core, to strengthen business, to control community-eroding sprawl, and keep a sense of place and community life in America.

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