2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Announced

EMBARGOED UNTIL:  Thursday, September 29, 2011—7:00 P.M. CST

CONTACT:          

Bonnie McDonald, Executive Director
Preservation Alliance of Minnesota
O: 651-293-9047 x5
C: 651-207-7693
bmcdonald@mnpreservation.org

 

2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Announced
Annual Program Honors 15 Projects and Individuals at Newly Renovated
Boy Scout Base Camp at Fort Snelling

(ST. PAUL, MN—September 29, 2011) — Tonight, the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM) presented 15 projects and individuals with a Minnesota Preservation Award at a ceremony held at the newly renovated Boy Scout Base Camp at Fort Snelling.  The Awards recognize significant achievement in historic preservation statewide and celebrate those who have chosen to sustainably reuse and reinvest in our existing built resources.  This year’s Minnesota Preservation Awards ceremony is no ordinary affair; this extraordinary party is also a celebration of PAM’s 30th anniversary in 2011. We’re commemorating our birthday by celebrating the past, present, and future of historic preservation in Minnesota.

 2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Recipients

(See the attached backgrounder media release for descriptive text.)

We are proud to recognize 15 projects, organizations, and individuals across Minnesota that demonstrate the link between revitalized historic properties and healthy, vital communities. PAM congratulates the following 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award winners and commends their work in preserving the historic assets that make our communities unique.  The 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award honorees, in order of award category, with name and location, are:


Adaptive Reuse Award

Eitel Building City Apartments (Minneapolis)

Pine River Depot (Pine River)

Renaissance Box (St. Paul

Addition / Expansion Award

Laird Norton Addition to the Winona County History Center (Winona)

Advocacy Award

Jackson Preservation Alliance (Jackson)
Maxine Ronglien (Owatonna)

Community Effort Award

Samuel J. Hewson House (Minneapolis)

Education/Interpretation/Publication Award

Interpretation Project, Chicago Avenue and 26th Street (Minneapolis)
Union Depot Historic Structures Report (St. Paul)

Emerging Leader Award

Preserve Minneapolis (Minneapolis)

Restoration/Rehabilitation Award

Boy Scout Base Camp, Building 201, Fort Snelling (Hennepin County)
Pence Building (Minneapolis)

Stewardship Award

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church (Minneapolis)

Sustainable Design Award
Welcome Center at the University of Minnesota – Morris (Morris)

Career Achievement Award and the Charles Nelson Award for Excellence

Chuck Liddy, FAIA (Minneapolis)

Photos

Photos of the award winners are available by request to Will O’Keefe at wokeefe@mnpreservation.org.  We will have limited ability to respond to requests between 3:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 29.

The Minnesota Preservation Awards Program

(See the attached backgrounder media release for a list of this year’s jurors, more information about the selection process, and the full Awards categories.)

This year, a total of 35 nominations were received, representing everything from small, community-led projects to large-scale, high-profile rehabilitation efforts. PAM assembled a distinguished panel of jurors for the difficult task of choosing the award winners. The jury, consisting of six individuals skilled in the fields of architecture, engineering, historic preservation, and real estate, selected 15 exceptional projects for recognition due to their significant contribution to Minnesota’s preservation accomplishments.  PAM was honored to welcome Mark Swenson, FAIA, President of ESG Architects, as our 2011 Awards Chair.

Over the past 27 years, more than 300 projects across the state have received recognition through the Minnesota Preservation Awards program. Awards are selected based on the creativity and quality of the project, the dedication and savvy of a group or individual, or most important, a positive preservation outcome. A complete list of Minnesota Preservation Award recipients from 1985 through this year’s Awards can be found on the PAM’s website.

About the Boy Scout Base Camp

(See the attached backgrounder for more information about the Boy Scout Base Camp.)

Tonight’s event is being held at the Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America Boy Scout Base Camp, constructed in 1907 as the Fort Snelling Cavalry Drill Hall and a National Historic Landmark.  This evening, event attendees will enjoy a special expedition touring the Boy Scout Base Camp and the National Historic Landmark Fort Snelling Upper Post. Tours go behind the scenes of the historic Upper Post to get a sneak peek of the Village of Fort Snelling, a new development concept for the historic Upper Post buildings that combines adaptive reuse of the existing structures and new construction on vacant parcels. Creating a feasible development solution for the Upper Post is a priority as it was listed multiple times on PAM’s 10 Most Endangered List and on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list in 2006.

The evening continues with the announcement and recognition of our 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award winners and an hors d’oeuvres reception. PAM will present the Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America with our prestigious Restoration / Rehabilitation Award this evening for their transformation of the historic Cavalry Drill Hall, Building 201.  PAM thanks the Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America for making this wonderful space available for the Minnesota Preservation Awards ceremony. 

Thanks to our Sponsors

Our sincere thanks go out to all of our Annual Organizational Sponsors for making PAM’s work possible throughout 2011: Premier Sponsor – Target; Landmark Sponsors – HGA and US Bank; Season Sponsors – Commerce Bank; Hess Roise and Company; MacDonald & Mack Architects; Miller Dunwiddie Architecture and Winthrop & Weinstine.

We also want to recognize the generous support of our Minnesota Preservation Awards Event Sponsors – Mahoney, Ulbrich, Christiansen, Russ P.A., as well as our VIP Tour Sponsors – Target and Hightower Initiatives, and our Restaurant/Wine Walls Sponsor – CKC Contracting and Meyer, Borgman, Johnson.  In-kind support has been provided by volunteer Alexandria Easter, designer of the 2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards insert.

About the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM):

(See the attached backgrounder media release for a more complete organizational description.)

Money raised through this event will support PAM, Minnesota’s only statewide, nonprofit historic preservation advocacy and education nonprofit organization.  PAM was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 1981 by Minnesota citizens concerned about the future of the state’s architectural and cultural landmarks. PAM’s formal mission is “to preserve, protect, and promote Minnesota’s historic resources.” We are a growing organization that positions itself at the center of a statewide network of individuals, businesses, and organizations engaging in preservation activity.  PAM exists to be a source of information, assistance, and inspiration to those who seek to preserve every community’s unique sense of place. We advocate for the preservation of our existing infrastructure, including housing, transportation networks, commercial centers, parks and open space, as key elements of a successful economic development strategy and sustainability platform.

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2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Backgrounder

Background information on 2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Winners

The following list includes:
• Thematic category for award

• Award name and location
• Brief description of award

• Award recipients

ADAPTIVE REUSE AWARD

Eitel Building City Apartments, Minneapolis

Built in 1911, the Eitel Building was originally used as a maternity hospital.  Considered state-of-the-art for its time, the facility was unique in offering a homelike atmosphere while conforming to every requirement of an up-to-date hospital.  Today, the original building has been adaptively reused as a 211 – unit loft and apartment complex with prime views of historic Loring Park.

The new addition to the original structure offers a dramatic contrast of old and new architecture differentiating the two eras of the complex’s design.  The use of brick on the new lobby entrance to the historic building, and on the addition, tie the buildings together while delineating old from new.  The central courtyard also provided a façade break to ensure balance in the scale and massing of the new addition.

The residents of this apartment building can take full advantage of urban living and a true neighborhood feel, with numerous food and entertainment amenities located within walking distance. The lobby, common spaces, and living environments were created with the intention of connecting the openness of the interior to the surrounding park setting and city atmosphere, with a new rooftop terrace that offers views of the park and downtown Minneapolis.  The Eitel Building City Apartments is a rebirth for this historic hospital, highlighting the early development of Loring Park and its future as a home for new Minneapolitans.

Owner/Developer: Village Green Apartments; Architectural Interior Design/Landscape Architecture/Mechanical, Electrical and Structural Engineering: BKV Group; Historical Consultant: Hess Roise & Company; General Contractor: Frana Companies; Civil Engineer: Schoell & Madson (now MFRA).

ADAPTIVE REUSE AWARD

Pine River Depot, Pine River

Built in 1895, the Pine River Depot played an important role in delivering goods, passengers, and mail to northern Minnesota for 90 years.  But, with the suspension of railroad service in 1985, the Depot closed its doors leaving an unknown future for the community landmark.  Faced with possible demolition for the expansion of Minnesota Trunk Highway 341, local citizens sprung into action forming the advocacy organization Heritage Group North.  Lobbied ardently by Heritage Group North to save the Depot, the Minnesota Department of Transportation, assisted by Cass County, agreed to relocate and restore the building to connect with the former rail bed now converted to the Paul Bunyan Trail.  The project was made possible by a $250,000 FHWA Transportation History Network Grant and MnDOT State Funds.

Transporting the historic Depot in one piece was a challenge due to its multiple additions and condition. A moving plan was prepared to coordinate the move with multiple partners and ensure the Depot’s safe passage.  After sitting vacant for over twenty years, the Depot’s condition required extensive repair informed by extensive research and a meticulous approach to preservation.

Moving the Depot provided an unexpected opportunity to restore the Depot’s connection to the City of Pine River. For many years, the public’s only view of the Depot was of its nondescript backside. Relocating and restoring the Depot allows it to once again greet Pine River’s public and is a case study in a collaborative project done right.

Owners: Minnesota Department of Transportation, Cass County Highway Department, City of Pine River, Heritage Group North; Architect: MacDonald & Mack Architects; Contractor: Gopher State Contractors; Advocate: Heritage Group North

ADAPTIVE REUSE AWARD

Renaissance Box, St. Paul

Constructed in 1914, the Renaissance Box was originally known as the O’Donnell Shoe Factory.  It served Minnesota’s shoe industry at the height of its prosperity, and by 1928, the O’Donnell Shoe Company had become a leading firm.  Its significance, however, goes beyond its original tenant.  The six-story building is engineered in cast-in-place concrete and was an early design using the Turner Concrete column structural system. The innovative structural system, patented by Minneapolitan C.A.P. Turner in 1908, uses only the slab for structural support and does not require beams. The structural slab is supported by concrete columns with uniquely configured capitals, a featured retained and celebrated in this project.

Several development proposals came and went for the O’Donnell Shoe Factory, the last of which calling the building Renaissance Box.  Purchasing the building out of foreclosure in 2006, nonprofit affordable housing developer Aeon opted to keep the name as they themselves inspired its renaissance.  Aeon sought to create a unique property that would truly benefit St. Paul by providing 70 affordable housing units, 14 units dedicated to those transitioning out of homelessness, an art studio and gallery space for residents, a green roof, and designed to achieve LEED Gold certification in 2012.

In August 2009, Renaissance Box was entered into the National Register of Historic Places, and expects to receive both federal and state historic tax credits, the first project in the state to use the new Minnesota incentive. But, for the passage of the state historic tax credit program in 2010, this project may never have gone forward.  Aeon’s efforts have saved the Renaissance Box from vacancy and deterioration, restored the building’s original aesthetic with additional energy-saving features, and reclaimed a neighborhood asset for needed affordable housing opportunities. Renaissance Box proves that historic preservation is not only the original green design, but also successful development.

General Partners: Ren Box LLC, Aeon; Developer/Nonprofit Organization: Aeon; Architect: LHB; Historic Consultant: Landscape Research LLC ; Contractor: Frerichs Construction; Financiers: Housing and Redevelopment Authority of the City of St. Paul, Minnesota Housing Finance Agency, Wells Fargo Bank, Family Housing Fund, Metropolitan Council, F. R. Bigelow Foundation, National Trust Loan Fund, The Saint Paul Foundation, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Houses of Hope Fund, Premier Banks, National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation, Enterprise Green Communities, The State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the Minnesota Historical Society, National Housing Trust Community Development Fund, Greater Metropolitan Housing Corporation, Fannie Mae, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, Non-profits Assistance Fund

ADDITION / EXPANSION AWARD

Laird Norton Addition to the Winona County History Center, Winona

The best way to ensure a future for a treasured historic building is to ensure it meets the changing needs of its user.  Expanding the building’s footprint with a compatible and sensitive addition is a common approach and one that was undertaken by the Winona County Historical Society.

Since the 1970’s, the Winona County History Center Museum has been located in the city’s 1915 National Register-listed armory, which had been a gift to the society from the Laird Norton Lumber Company.  The building had served its purpose well, but six years ago, the History Center’s leadership began a campaign to add more exhibition space and additional space for public and private events. Thanks to the Laird Norton family and other generous donors, expansion soon commenced.

The resulting 12,400-square-foot addition by HGA’s Joan Soranno stretches out from the armory’s south wall via a corbelled brick colonnade referencing the armory’s recessed entry door. Atop the end of the colonnade is a second-story box clad in copper. The forms are crisply modern, but the materials are beautifully resonant with the armory.

Inside is an expansive new lobby—perfect for both functions and exhibits—finished with a salvaged-white-pine floor and ceiling. The sensitivity this breathtaking addition shows to its historic counterpart made the Minnesota Preservation Awards jury’s decision an easy one.

Owner: Winona County Historical Society; Architect / Structural, Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineer / Lighting Design: HGA; General Contractor: Alvin Benike; Photography: Paul Crosby; Principal Funders: the Laird Norton Family.

ADVOCACY AWARD

Jackson Preservation Alliance, Jackson

In the southern Minnesota community of Jackson, the historic Jackson County Resource Center held an important place in many of the citizens’ hearts.  Since 1938, the Work Projects Administration (WPA) built Center had served the community as its high school, middle school, and finally, as Jackson County’s social services center.  When the County announced plans in 2009 to demolish the structure for a new building, there were mixed reactions in the community.

A group of citizens formed the Jackson Preservation Alliance (JPA) to advocate for the Center’s preservation and to develop an adaptive reuse proposal.  Led by a nine-member board, the group worked tirelessly to educate fellow citizens about the options available and the economic advantages of saving the building.  Nonetheless, the County Commission moved forward with a bonding proposal to demolish the structure. Despite the bond’s failure, a petition to rehabilitate the Center, which was signed by more than 500 citizens, and the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota’s listing of the Jackson County Resource Center as a 10 Most Endangered in 2010, the County Commission continued to move forward with its plans for demolition.

The JPA saw no other choice than to file a lawsuit based on the State’s cultural resource protection legislation to prevent the demolition.  JPA raised more than $25,000 to secure the necessary performance bond; however, the court ruled in favor of the County Commission, and in January of 2011, the Jackson County Resource Center was demolished.

Despite the regrettable ending to their advocacy efforts, the JPA has used the experience to galvanize support in the community for other preservation efforts like saving Jackson’s historic movie theater.  We commend the members of the JPA for demonstrating courage and resolve in the face of adversity to save a significant local landmark.  We believe they are a statewide model for citizen action.

Jackson Preservation Alliance Board Members: Cathy Strube-Buxengard; Cheryl Brooks; Jane Morris; Jeri Sirovy; Mary Allen; Dorothy Benson; Kyle Fricke; Laura Tusa; Gordon Willett

ADVOCACY AWARD

Maxine Ronglien, Owatonna

One person can make a difference, especially one that inspires others to take action.  Maxine Ronglien is one person who has made a difference for thousands of Minnesotans.  She and her husband, Harvey, have been stalwart advocates for the preservation of the West Hills, the former Minnesota State Public School Orphanage campus in Owatonna.

Built between 1886 and 1931, the Orphanage campus is comprised of 18 historic administrative and residential buildings that housed more than 10,000 children before it closed in 1945.  One of those children was Maxine’s husband, Harvey Ronglien.  The City of Owatonna purchased the campus in 1974 to use for its administrative offices.  The removal of the 1898 school in the early 1990’s prompted Maxine and Harvey to begin a campaign to protect and restore the West Hills campus.

Maxine chaired the West Hills Commission, a mayoral-appointed body to ensure the Orphanage’s preservation and operational sustainability.  In 1999, the Orphanage Museum was incorporated as a nonprofit with Maxine serving as Chairperson and Chief Operations Director until her retirement on June 14, 2011.  Having raised thousands of dollars, and dedicating thousands of volunteer hours, Maxine contributed to the significant preservation successes at West Hills, the most recent of which was its 2011 listing as a National Register Historic District.

The Preservation Alliance of Minnesota is proud to recognize Maxine Ronglien with an Advocacy Award for the more than two decades she has dedicated to the preservation of the West Hills Campus.  Her efforts have ensured that future generations will continue to experience this important Minnesota story where that history happened.

COMMUNITY EFFORT AWARD

Samuel J. Hewson House, Minneapolis

In the spring of 2010, the Samuel J. Hewson House, a jewel in Minneapolis’ Whittier neighborhood, stood vacant — a victim of the foreclosure crisis affecting the nation.  Designed by Kees and Colburn, interior decoration by John S. Bradstreet, and built by local contractor T.P. Healy in 1905, this property had an architectural pedigree to rival those on Summit Avenue.

In the summer of 2009, threats to the Hewson House became known to the greater community as the then-owners, facing foreclosure, attempted to strip the interior of the home and sell the parts at an estate sale.  The Whittier Alliance intervened, and as a result, the impressive interior remains largely intact.  The Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission designated the Hewson House as a Minneapolis landmark, establishing interim protection while the designation study was being prepared.

The property went into foreclosure and the bank started procedures to auction off the historic interior woodwork, artwork, and fixtures.  Quick action by Preserve Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Historic Homeowners Association stopped the proceedings.  Soon after, the original fireplace mantle mural was cut from the plaster and stolen; still to be located.  All of this prompted the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota to list the Hewson House on its 2010 10 Most Endangered Historic Places List.

The listing caught the attention of Gary Kirt, president of Bell Mortgage, and a Preservation Alliance of Minnesota member.  Gary negotiated purchase of the property in order to prevent further deterioration.  Bell Mortgage invested in repairing the home’s mechanical systems and listed it for sale at a steeply discounted price from its appraised value.  Re/MAX Results donated real estate services to place the home on the 2011 Minneapolis – St. Paul Home Tour, where it was first in attendance amongst 55 homes.  The plan worked; a couple purchased the property in spring of 2011.  The new owners plan to restore the Hewson House as a single-family home with the help of the owner’s preservation contracting business.  Thanks to the collaboration of many individuals and organizations, the Samuel J. Hewson House will continue to shine as one of Minneapolis’ fine historic jewels.

Community participants: Gary Kirt, Bell Mortgage; Whittier Alliance; Re/MAX Results; Councilmember Robert Lilligren; Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission; Minneapolis Historic Homeowners Association; Preserve Minneapolis

EDUCATION / INTERPRETATION / PUBLICATION AWARD

Interpretation Project, Chicago Avenue and 26th Street, Minneapolis

Children’s Hospital recently completed a substantial expansion of its facility in the Phillips neighborhood in south Minneapolis.  The hospital serves as an important anchor in the community, providing jobs, services, and institutional stability.  However, it recognized that the expansion provided an opportunity to reach out to the community with other amenities that contribute to its overall health and vitality.  The expansion included an extensive art installation, including a “healing garden,” where children and their families can enjoy the outdoors.  The garden is also a bridge between the neighborhood and the hospital campus.

Additional aspects of the art installation were eight interpretive panels that tell the story of how the Phillips neighborhood developed.  The street corner at Chicago Avenue and 26th Street, an important transfer point for buses traveling east-west and north-south, was identified as a site to reach a broad community audience.  The panels were installed with graphics and “headlines” to attract people’s attention.  They focus on the theme of transportation, providing insight into the neighborhood’s history as well as broader historical patterns.  Chicago Avenue has been an important transportation corridor since the late nineteenth century, serving as one of the city’s first horse-car routes, then a major streetcar line, and later a bus route.

For highlighting an important facet of the community’s history in an attractive format that is available 24/7, this project has earned a 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award.

Owner: Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota; Public Advocate: Councilmember Gary Schiff; Landscape Architect/Graphics: Close Landscape Architecture; Historical Consultant: Hess, Roise and Company

EDUCATION / INTERPRETATION / PUBLICATION AWARD

Union Depot Historic Structures Report, St. Paul

Built between 1917 and 1926, Saint Paul Union Depot, located in the Lowertown area of downtown Saint Paul, was the largest 20th century construction project in the city.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, both individually and as a contributing building in the Lowertown Historic District.

After years of limited use and with a significant portion of the Depot vacant, it took visionary leadership to recognize Union Depot’s potential.  In steps the Ramsey County Regional Rail Authority.  The Authority purchased the ailing building and site in 2009 in order to convert it to a multi-modal transportation hub.  By 2014, the Depot will host the Central Corridor Light Rail; Amtrak; Greyhound and Jefferson bus lines; Metro Transit bus service; taxi service; and a bicycle center.  Union Depot’s future may also include a possible high-speed rail line connecting St. Paul to Chicago and commuter rail to Hastings.

As part of the Central Corridor LRT project, a Section 106 Programmatic Agreement (PA) was executed by the Federal Transit Administration, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office, and Metropolitan Council.  The PA required preparation of a Historic Structures Report (HSR) for the property, including the Head House, concourse area, train deck, and associated trackage.  The report documents the history of the building within a broader national transportation and economic context; evaluates its significance; assesses existing conditions; and recommends activities for future rehabilitation.

This award recognizes the HSR team for the thoroughness of the document, the quality of the research that went into its creation, its critical role in the sensitive conversion of the historic Union Depot to a next generation multi-modal transportation hub, and the sheer beauty of every single page.

Owner: Ramsey County Regional Rail Authority; Architect: HGA Architects and Engineers; Report Research and Preparation: Beyer Blinder Belle; Preservation Consultant: Luken Architecture

EMERGING LEADER AWARD

Preserve Minneapolis, Minneapolis

Education and advocacy are two of the cornerstones of historic preservation, helping to build knowledge and appreciation of historic places among the general public.  Since 2004, Preserve Minneapolis has played an instrumental role in these efforts in Minneapolis, through newsletters, a website, seminars, tours, calls to action, and public events.  Guided by a Board of Directors with backgrounds in design, architecture, history, heritage preservation, city planning, writing, marketing, and photography, Preserve Minneapolis has become a local leader in preservation advocacy.  Beyond its preservation agenda, the organization collaborates with residents, governmental units and businesses to address broader community issues such as gentrification, housing foreclosures and community economic development.

The Preservation Alliance of Minnesota recognizes Preserve Minneapolis as an “emerging leader” both for its pioneering efforts in filling a void in neighborhood-based preservation efforts in Minneapolis, and for its on-going evolution in mission, scope, and action.  The organization continues to evolve to stay abreast of current preservation issues and their relationship to community livability.  For example, it is currently expanding its fundraising efforts so that it can continue to partner with other organizations on future community projects.  Preserve Minneapolis has proven that it can be nimble in responding to preservation issues, thorough and informed in its understanding of the issues, and strategic in galvanizing community action.  We look forward to watching this “emerging leader” grow.

Preserve Minneapolis Board: John Stark, Lee Ann Gustafson, Steve Budas, Ann Calvert, Elizabeth Gales, Chuck Liddy, Tammy Lindberg, Pete Sieger, Will O’Keefe, Douglas Mack, Bayard Engelhardt

RESTORATION / REHABILITATION AWARD

Boy Scout Base Camp, Building 201, Fort Snelling, Hennepin County

Fort Snelling was built on a dramatic bluff at the junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in 1820. After a major expansion starting in 1879 that established the Fort Snelling Upper Post, the fort was threatened with closure by an Army reorganization in the late nineteenth century. Instead, the fort was expanded and the base’s infantry troops were joined by new artillery and cavalry units.

The expansion resulted in a construction campaign that produced barracks, stables, and Building 201—a cavalry drill hall where horses could be trained regardless of the weather.  In addition to military functions, the massive hall hosted a variety of public events including horse shows, boxing matches, riding lessons, indoor polo, and even ice skating.

The Army officially decommissioned Fort Snelling in 1946.  The original citadel eventually became a Minnesota Historical Society museum, but other parts of the fort were lost to freeway expansion or sat vacant, earning the Upper Post a place on the “Most Endangered” lists of both Preservation Alliance of Minnesota and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  Building 201 did have continued use for office and storage space until it was purchased by the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board in 2000 when it was vacated and boarded.

The Northern Star Council of the Boy Scouts of America came to the rescue for Building 201, recognizing that the former cavalry drill hall could become a 21st century camp for active young boys to learn needed skills.   A $5 million sustainable, adaptive reuse effort has transformed the space into an innovative base camp with a rock-climbing wall, high ropes course, catering kitchen, classrooms, office space, and gathering space for groups of up to 500 people.  As an example of the creative use of an unusual historic structure—and for its pioneering role launching the revitalization of Fort Snelling’s Upper Post—this project merits a 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award.

Owner: Northern Star Council, Boy Scouts of America Base Camp; Board/Volunteer Support: Coleman Hull and Van Vliet, Target Corporation; Architect: LHB, Inc.; Contractor: J. E. Dunn; Historical Consultant: Landscape Research, LLC; Energy Modeling: The Weidt Group; Climbing Wall and COPE Course: Themescapes; Civil Engineer: Bonestroo; Photographer: Dana Wheelock Photography

RESTORATION / REHABILITATION AWARD

Pence Building, Minneapolis

In 1908 a young, energetic entrepreneur, Harry Pence, purchased land at 800 Hennepin Avenue to build the headquarters of his newest business endeavor, the Pence Automobile Company.  Pence grew his business to become one the first and largest Buick dealers in the country.

Over the years, the building has been home to other businesses including Minneapolis Gas and Light Company, Lincoln National Bank, and the Carmichael Lynch Advertising Agency.  When the Agency moved out in 2007, the future of the vacant building was in question, until Turnstone 800 Partners decided to rehabilitate the Pence building into a multi-tenant office property.  Today the building stands proud among many renovated buildings in and around the area and it serves as an important connection between the buildings in the Warehouse District and the Central Business District of Downtown Minneapolis.  Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the Turnstone 800 Partners utilized federal historic tax credits to help finance the project.

The eight-story Pence building was originally designed by the architectural firm of Long and Kees who also designed other notable downtown properties similar in style such as the Lumber and Flour Exchange buildings.  The handsome historic exterior appearance of the Pence building has stood the test of time and features the use of granite and terra-cotta.  New display and office windows that are in keeping with the dimensions, style, and materials of the originals, have been installed. On the interior, the original ceiling heights and the cast-concrete structural elements have been revealed and the newly created common areas of the office building enhance and compliment the historic nature and feel of the building.

For ensuring the Pence drives ahead as a Minneapolis landmark in showroom condition, we recognize the project participants with a 2011 Minnesota Preservation Award.

Owner: Turnstone 800 Partners LLC; Contractors: Diversified Construction; Historical Consultant: Hess, Roise and Company

STEWARDSHIP AWARD

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Minneapolis

Our Lady of Lourdes, which sits perched on a hill high above the St. Anthony Falls, was originally built as a Universalist church in 1857 when that side of the river was still the village of St. Anthony.  Constructed out of local Platteville limestone, the church was originally designed in a simple neoclassical plan.  In 1877, it was purchased by the French-Canadian Catholics who converted it to a French Gothic Revival structure.

In 2005, Our Lady of Lourdes retained Miller Dunwiddie Architecture to assess the existing conditions and develop a master plan to address them as the structure neared its 150th anniversary.  The project proceeded in several phases over the last six years to address needed maintenance and meet the congregation’s changing needs.  Work has included infrastructure upgrades; remodeling of the lower level to add a kitchen and handicapped-accessible restrooms; exterior restoration; stabilization of the bell tower; and renovation of the church interior, including plaster repair, lighting, finishes, and plan updates to maximize seating.

The renovation of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church is an excellent example of an institution that is preserving both its historic building and its cultural heritage. The building has a long history of adaptation, from its initial beginnings as a different denomination and architectural style, through many additions and interior remodeling projects.  The congregation has maintained a strong sense of its history and ties to its French-Canadian heritage, such as French architectural elements and decoration in the church.  This has not been easy, but instead of seeing these things as barriers, the church has embraced them as part of what makes the building particularly special.

Owner: Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church; Architecture, Historic Preservation, & Interior Design: Miller Dunwiddie Architecture, Inc.; Structural Engineers: Meyer Borgman Johnson; Mechanical & Electrical Engineers, Lighting Design: Michaud Cooley Erickson; General Contractor: McGough Construction; Civil Engineering and Landscape Architecture: SRF Consulting Group; Materials Testing: American Engineering Testing; Surveying: C.E. Coulter & Associates, Inc.; Roofing Consultant: Roof Spec Inc.; Decorative Finishes Consulting: Conrad Schmidt Studios; Stained Glass Consulting/Rehabilitation: Gaytee Stained Glass

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AWARD

Welcome Center at the University of Minnesota – Morris

The selection of the University of Minnesota Morris Welcome Center for a Minnesota Preservation Award in the Sustainability category should come as no surprise.  The University has achieved its goal of carbon neutrality and energy self-sufficiency with the aid of wind turbines and a biomass facility.  The project architects—Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle (MS&R)—have been the masters of inspired adaptive reuses of historic structures for 30 years.  Merging the forces of sustainable energy, sustainable design, and sustainable reuse of an existing building further demonstrates that the University of Minnesota Morris is leading the way for institutions statewide.

Certified LEED-Gold in 2011, the University of Minnesota Morris Welcome Center is a modern, light-filled renovation of the school’s 1915 engineering building, a brick structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  The building now houses admissions, continuing education, and the Center for Small Towns.  MS&R led the restoration of the historic exterior, which included reopening windows that had been bricked-in in the 1970s.  Daylight now fills an open, 21st-century interior with rural flourishes: wheatgrass embedded in translucent partition panels, sustainable carpeting in the colors and pattern of farm fields as seen from above.

Reclaimed and recycled materials are used throughout the building, with the largest reclaimed element being the building itself.  However, the project’s most talked-about green feature is its use of chilled beams—thin pipes running cold water across ceilings, lightly blown with air—to cool the building. The technology is popular in Europe, but the Welcome Center is the first Minnesota building and the first entire building on the National Register to use it.  If the chilled beams aren’t enough to signal this project’s intentions, an energy kiosk in the lobby charts the campus’ energy performance in real time.

For forging a new path that recognizes the green value of adaptive reuse, the respect for low-tech, sustainable design features in historic buildings, and the sensitive integration of high-tech energy-efficient systems, we recognize the project participants with the 2011 Sustainable Design Award.

Owner: University of Minnesota – Morris; Architecture and Interior Design: Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle, Ltd. (MS&R); Mechanical / Electrical Engineers: Karges-Faulconbridge, Inc. (KFI); Structural / Civil Engineers: BKBM Engineers; Landscape Architect: Oslund and Associates, Inc.; General Contractor: JE Dunn Construction North Central

CAREER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Chuck Liddy, FAIA, Minneapolis

Charles Nelson Award for Excellence

Chuck Liddy’s professional career has passionately focused on the preservation of our historic architectural and cultural treasures, vastly enriching our lives through powerful planning and design, uncompromised technical expertise, and public service.

Chuck Liddy is an architect and historic preservation leader who brings an exceptional blend of design, technical proficiency, and common sense to projects. For over 30 years, he has elevated and transformed historic preservation from a rare event to a major force in architectural practice.  At the local and national levels, Chuck demonstrates architectural and preservation leadership through speaking, mentoring, volunteer work, and service to public and non-profit organizations.

As a principal with Miller Dunwiddie Architecture in Minneapolis, Chuck has led over 200 historic preservation projects – from modest farmhouses and barns, to a nationally significant basilica – including scores of buildings and dozens of districts on the National Register of Historic Places.  He has served on the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission, the Minnesota Historical Society State Review Board, the Mississippi River St. Anthony Falls Heritage Board, the Boards of Preserve Minneapolis, and the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota.  In fact, Chuck was the very first chair of the Minnesota Preservation Awards when it began in 1985.  He has played a truly significant role in building the visibility and viability of these dedicated organizations.  In addition, Chuck took a leadership role and made major contributions to AIA committees at the local and national levels that resulted in exceptional preservation programs at AIA National and Minnesota Conventions and National Trust for Historic Preservation Conferences.  He also served as President of the AIA Minneapolis Chapter in 2009.

In 2011, Chuck was elevated to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2011 for his nationally significant contribution to historic preservation.

As an expert in preservation who can see beyond today, Chuck’s work touches the lives of thousands of people, many of whom understand more about the promise of architecture from the experience of working with him, and that preservation is not about freezing the past, but building on the best of what went before to meet future needs.

2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Jury Members

Mark Swenson, FAIA, President, ESG Architects, AIA North Central States Regional Director, 2011 Minnesota Preservation Awards Chair

Sonja Dusil, NorthMarq

Chris Hudson, Editor, Architecture Minnesota

Dan Murphy, PE, President, Meyer, Borgman, Johnson

Charlene Roise, President, Hess Roise and Company

Lucy Thompson, Senior Planner, City of Saint Paul

The Minnesota Preservation Awards Jury, Categories, and Selection Criteria

This year, a total of 35 nominations were received, representing everything from small, community-led projects to large-scale, high-profile rehabilitation efforts. PAM assembled a distinguished panel of jurors for the difficult task of choosing the award winners. The jury, consisting of six individuals skilled in the fields of architecture, engineering, historic preservation, and real estate, selected 15 exceptional projects for recognition due to their significant contribution to Minnesota’s preservation accomplishments.  PAM was honored to welcome Mark Swenson, FAIA, President of ESG Architects, as our 2011 Awards Chair.  Swenson, one of the region’s most prestigious architects, serves as AIA North Central States Regional Director, and is a 2009 Minnesota Preservation Award Career Achievement Award Winner.  His distinguished preservation career has included such high-profile projects as Minneapolis’ Milwaukee Road Depot, Midtown Exchange (former Sears Warehouse), and W Minneapolis – The Foshay.

Over the past 27 years, over 300 projects across the state have received recognition through the Minnesota Preservation Awards program in the categories of adaptive reuse, addition/expansion, advocacy, archaeology, career achievement, community effort, education/interpretation, emerging leader, preservation planning, restoration/rehabilitation, stewardship, and sustainable design.  In 2007, PAM created a special designation, “The Charles Nelson Award for Excellence,” in which we pay tribute to the lifelong preservation achievements of former State Preservation Architect Charles “Charlie” Nelson.  Nelson’s career spanned more than 30 years at the Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office and oversaw many of the state’s most noted preservation success stories.

Minnesota Preservation Awards are selected based on the creativity and quality of the project, the dedication and savvy of a group or individual, or most important, a positive preservation outcome.  The jury pays special attention to ensuring the Awards represent the diverse locations and budgets represented in the nomination process, as well as ensuring there are A complete list of Minnesota Preservation Award recipients from 1985 through this year’s Awards can be found on the PAM’s website.

About the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM)

Money raised through this event will support PAM, Minnesota’s only statewide, nonprofit historic preservation advocacy and education nonprofit organization.  PAM was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 1981 by Minnesota citizens concerned about the future of the state’s architectural and cultural landmarks. Now celebrating its 30th anniversary, PAM has grown into a network representing thousands of individuals, businesses and groups throughout Minnesota. Beyond our membership, we collaborate and partner with other citizens, municipalities, organizations and agencies from the national to the local level.

PAM’s formal mission is “to preserve, protect, and promote Minnesota’s historic resources.” We are a growing organization that positions itself at the center of a statewide network of individuals, businesses, and organizations engaging in preservation activity.  PAM exists to be a source of information, assistance, and inspiration to those who seek to preserve every community’s unique sense of place. We work statewide to empower property owners, local governments, and developers with needed financial and policy tools to facilitate historic preservation projects. In 2010, PAM was successful in securing passage of the needed Minnesota state historic preservation tax credit and re-launching the local economic development program, Minnesota Main Street. Looking forward, PAM is moving itself into a position to engage directly in historic real estate to increase tools we can offer to our stakeholders.  We advocate for the preservation of our existing infrastructure, including housing, transportation networks, commercial centers, parks and open space, as key elements of a successful economic development strategy and sustainability platform.

About the Boy Scout Base Camp

The newly renovated Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America Boy Scout Base Camp at the historic Fort Snelling Upper Post is the site for this year’s ceremony, a fitting tribute to the concept behind the Minnesota Preservation Awards recognizing the continued use of our historic assets.  Attendees were provided with a special expedition touring the Boy Scout Base Camp as the first completed adaptive reuse project at the National Historic Landmark Fort Snelling Upper Post.  Boy Scout Base Camp, a National Historic Landmark district, furthers the outdoor education mission of the Scouts with a particular focus on serving urban youth with few opportunities to experience scouting and nature-based activities. The United States Department of War built the Fort Snelling Cavalry Drill Hall in 1907, closely following the United States Army Quartermaster’s Standard Plan 97A. The building was used to house mounted drills for cavalry, infantry, and artillery troops. Over the years, it hosted horse shows, boxing matches, indoor polo and ice skating.

The buildings at the Fort Snelling Upper Post offer tremendous potential for development, but most are in need of significant rehabilitation. Base Camp is the first complete building renovation at the Upper Post and should lead the way for many similar efforts in the future. This wonderful building is bustling with activity once again and we are proud to present the Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America with our prestigious Restoration / Rehabilitation Award this evening.  PAM thanks the Northern Star Council – Boy Scouts of America for making this wonderful space available for the Minnesota Preservation Awards ceremony.

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