Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Facility (Fergus Falls)

During the nineteenth century, state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill grew considerably, and asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received state bond funds to be used for disposition of the buildings or related infrastructure improvements. With no clear reuse plan in the works, the city is considering using the state bonding funds to demolish the historic complex. A group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and even conducts security sweeps and light maintenance of the vacant structure. The Friends group is exploring new reuse options, and hopes to work with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

The nineteenth century saw considerable growth in the state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill, and accordingly, asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received funds from the state to be used for demolition of the buildings or for infrastructure impro

The nineteenth century saw considerable growth in the state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill, and accordingly, asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received funds from the state to be used for demolition of the buildings or for infrastructure improvements. With no clear investor identified, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride have taken on the responsibilities of advocacy and even security maintenance of the vacant structure.   The group regularly guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and are working with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

The nineteenth century saw considerable growth in the state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill, and accordingly, asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received funds from the state to be used for demolition of the buildings or for infrastructure improvements. With no clear investor identified, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride have taken on the responsibilities of advocacy and even security maintenance of the vacant structure.   The group regularly guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and are working with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

The nineteenth century saw considerable growth in the state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill, and accordingly, asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received funds from the state to be used for demolition of the buildings or for infrastructure improvements. With no clear investor identified, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride have taken on the responsibilities of advocacy and even security maintenance of the vacant structure.   The group regularly guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and are working with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

The nineteenth century saw considerable growth in the state-sponsored treatment of the mentally ill, and accordingly, asylum buildings and treatment centers were built in large numbers across the US. Construction on the Fergus Falls Regional Treatment Center began in 1888, and accepted its first patients in 1906. Providing care for thousands of patients for over 100 years, the Regional Treatment Center (RTC) also played a key role in the local economy. With dwindling patient population, the RTC closed in 2005. Soon after, the city of Fergus Falls received funds from the state to be used for demolition of the buildings or for infrastructure improvements. With no clear investor identified, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride have taken on the responsibilities of advocacy and even security maintenance of the vacant structure.   The group regularly guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and are working with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

vements. With no clear investor identified, a group of volunteers known as the Friends of the Kirkbride have taken on the responsibilities of advocacy and even security maintenance of the vacant structure. The group regularly guides tours through the RTC facilities to raise awareness, and are working with potential investors before the threat of demolition becomes all too real.

To find out more about tours and the Friends of the Kirkbride visit their Facebook page.

To learn more about Kirkbride architecture click here…

Comments Closed