Homes on the Range, part 1 – Eveleth

by Erin Hanafin Berg, Field Representative

August 21, 2009

Right after the Fourth of July, I made a field visit to the Iron Range. I visited Hibbing, Chisholm, Virginia, and Eveleth, and reveled in the preservation opportunities that about in these cities. All four have good commercial historic districts that would be a great fit for the Main Street program that the Preservation Alliance hopes to launch in 2010, and I’ll blog about those eventually. But I was also captivated by the variety of homes and housing styles in these communities, and I love to imagine the history they represent.

The W. Bailey House, Eveleth

The W. Bailey House, Eveleth

The W. Bailey House, on Pierce Street in Eveleth, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The bottom of the house is brownstone, although this photo does not show it well. The house, built in 1905, also had a “For Sale” sign out front in early July, although I can’t find a current listing.

I thought this triplex was quite stunning. Maybe just the answer for a harried household with two working parents, small kids, and two sets of retired grandparents. Or maybe not.

Triplex, Pierce Street, Eveleth

Triplex, Pierce Street, Eveleth

What a cool juxtaposition of this high-style, urban townhouse with the two vernacular cottages. Notice how all three lots are the same width? Judging from the narrow lots, Eveleth was platted for a dense population—and probably also to keep the ore-rich earth underneath the city as accessible as possible. I wonder what the two gable-roofed houses looked like with their original siding.

Brick townhouse, Jackson Street, Eveleth

Brick townhouse, Jackson Street, Eveleth

I think these three following photos illustrate the range of historic workers housing in Eveleth. The difference between laborers, supervisors, and mining company executives, perhaps.

Vernacular cottages ner downtown Eveleth

Vernacular cottages near downtown Eveleth

A variety of house styles near the Manual Training School in Eveleth.

A variety of house styles near the Manual Training School in Eveleth.

(The Manual Training School, my point of reference and a very cool Moderne style building constructed in 1914 (decades before the style became really popular), is also listed in the National Register.)

Mining company executive homes (possibly), Eveleth

Mining company executive homes (possibly), Eveleth

Tons more pictures where these came from. I’ll post more, of Hibbing’s variety of residential architecture, next week. (Sorry, no picture of Bob Dylan’s house, though.)

Feel free to send your comments to PAMfieldnotes@gmail.com

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